NOC Family Coping

Prevents attack before it begins and increases ventilation.

Promotes compliance in order to prevent attack and maintain wellness (action of drug).

Identifies allergies for hypersensitization regimen. Offers support to families with child suffering from asthma.

INTERVENTIONS

Provide an opportunity for the family to adjust to the diagnosis; anticipate the normal grief reaction of "loss of the perfect child."

Explore the family's feelings regarding the child and the diagnosis.

Assist the family to explore specific feelings regarding: guilt, anger, disappointment, irritation, and fear; discuss with parents their fears: dealing with the child's anxiety, fear of complications, fear of death, fear of tests and procedures, fear of treatments, and the child's potential inability to feel "normal" as compared to peers; help family to identify realistic and unrealistic fears.

Assess the family's coping skills and resources.

Foster positive family relationships; serve as a role model regarding attitudes and behaviors towards the child.

Assess interpersonal relationships within the family and support systems, with emphasis on the family's relationship with the child diagnosed with asthma; intervene appropriately with evidence of maladaptation; refer to counseling if appropriate (specify).

Provide support to the family; assess family's support systems and encourage their appropriate use; refer to community agencies and support groups, as applicable (specify).

Assess siblings and peers at intervals, as appropriate, providing time for questions and feelings.

Provide information to the family regarding the disorder, treatments,

RATIONALES

Reaction may occur in the early adjustment phase, after the diagnosis of a chronic disease, depending on the severity.

Indicators of family-related psychologic stress often are obtained during open discussions as part of a history-taking; family stressors, if found early, can be the focus of preventive services to promote adaptation.

Validates the normalcy of their feelings which promotes stress reduction and positive coping skills.

Promotes reinforcement of positive coping skills. Promotes the family's ability to cope in a positive manner.

Promotes early identification of interpersonal problems, especially within the parent-child relationship.

Promotes positive adaptation within the family.

Promotes positive relationships within siblings and peers, which can be altered by chronic illness that requires increased parental attention, and so forth.

Promotes a sense of control and alleviates stress; reinforcement and implications; reinforce all information given; provide accurate information, paced at a rate appropriate for the family (specify).

Encourage family in methods to promote the child's physical, psychological, and cognitive development, based on child's current developmental level (specify).

Assist family in the development and implementation of a home plan of care, utilizing age-appropriate goals consistent with activity tolerance.

Explain to child/family the possible benefits of hyposensitization therapy where allergies cannot be avoided, as applicable.

Teach child and family correct use of metered dose inhaler, nebulizer, and peak flow meter; emphasize understanding of equipment usage, cleaning, and strategies for compliance.

Instruct child and family on preventive treatment when applicable (specify, i.e., prevention of exercise-induced asthma can be accomplished by use of certain medications prophylactically).

Encourage child and family to engage in good health practices, such as balanced nutritional diet, adequate rest, good hygiene, and follow-up care.

Reinforce methods to prevent infections: good handwashing, cleaning and care of equipment used, and avoidance of exposures.

Review with parents the signs of depression, especially in the adolescent; make appropriate referrals as needed (specify).

Coping with Asthma

Coping with Asthma

If you suffer with asthma, you will no doubt be familiar with the uncomfortable sensations as your bronchial tubes begin to narrow and your muscles around them start to tighten. A sticky mucus known as phlegm begins to produce and increase within your bronchial tubes and you begin to wheeze, cough and struggle to breathe.

Get My Free Ebook


Post a comment