Dermatologic Physical Examination

Apocrine Glands

The four components of the dermatologic physical examination are 1 primary lesions, 2 secondary lesions, 3 distribution, and 4 configuration. Because primary and secondary lesions are rather constant with most dermatitides, they should be relied on heavily to lead to the correct diagnosis. The two other basic components of the physical exam, distribution and configuration, are used for support and confirmation. Some skin disorders lack a distinct distribution or configuration. Occasionally,...

Indicated Supporting Diagnostic Data

Saucerization

Examination of the skin remains a discipline that relies heavily on the basic clinical skills of vision and touch. If this information is combined with the practitioner's knowledge of the disease process, the correct diagnosis can be determined with a minimum of expensive laboratory testing. The dermatologist usually orders labwork to confirm a diagnosis or to stage the disease process rather than using it to seek a diagnosis. After all, the disease process is evolving before your eyes. In...

Molluscum Contagiosum Dimple Warts

Warts Pubic Area

A 16-year-old male high school student presents with a large number of papular lesions of recent onset in the right thoracic and axillary region. There is a second grouping of similar lesions on the right knee. The patient is on the wrestling team, desires removal of the lesions, and was sent to you by his wrestling coach to find out if they might be contagious. You suspect this is molluscum contagiosum. 1. What are the primary lesions you would expect to find in molluscum contagiosum 2. What...