Radiologic Characteristics of Jugular Foramen Tumors

Technique

Paraganglioma

Schwannoma

Meningioma

High-resolution computer tomography

MRI with gadolinium

Angiography

Irregular margin of tumor

Irregular bony erosion of the jugular foramen

No reactive sclerosis or hyperosteosis

No intralesional calcification

Marked contrast enhancement

Isointense on T1- and hyperintense on T2-weighted images

Salt-and-pepper appearance due the signal void of high-flow vascular channels

Bright enhancement with gadolinium

Highly vascular with a bright rapid-filling blush

Smooth margin of tumor

Smooth bony erosion of the jugular foramen, producing an ovoid defect

Bony margin may show reactive sclerosis; no hyperosteosis

Intralesional calcification rare

Mild contrast enhancement

Hypointense on T1-and hyperintense on T2-weighted images

More homogeneous

Moderate enhancement with gadolinium

Relatively avascular with a much slower, less vivid tumor blush

Smooth margin of tumor

Smooth bony erosion of the jugular foramen

Bony margin may show reactive sclerosis and hyperosteosis

Intralesional calcification common

Moderate contrast enhancement

Isointense on both T1-and T2-weighted images

More homogeneous

Moderate enhancement with gadolinium

Relatively avascular with a much slower, less vivid tumor blush decreases intraoperative hemorrhage and improves the demarcation of the tumor from the surrounding tissue, shortening the operating time.33 Temporal bone paragangliomas derive their blood supply initially from the external carotid artery, predominantly the postauricular, ascending pharyngeal, and occipital arteries. As the tumor enlarges, it may also receive branches from the internal carotid artery (caroticotympanic) or the vertebrobasilar system.

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