How Much Calcium Do I Need

According to nutritional guidelines from the National Institutes of Health, adolescents and young adults should take in 1,200 to 1,500 milligrams of calcium per day; men ages 25 through 65 should take in 1,000 milligrams of calcium per day; and men over age 65 should take in 1,500 milligrams of calcium per day. Good sources of calcium include low-fat and nonfat dairy products; green, leafy vegetables; dried peas and beans; and calcium-fortified foods. The following table lists some good sources of calcium and the approximate amount of calcium they contain:

Good Sources of Calcium

Food Serving Size Calcium (in milligrams)

Low-fat or nonfat plain yogurt

1 cup

468

2 percent milk

1 cup

350

Sardines with bones, canned

3 ounces

324

Calcium-fortified orange juice

1 cup

320

1 percent milk or fat-free milk

1 cup

300

Mozzarella cheese, part skim

1 ounce

207

Salmon with bones, canned

3 ounces

181

Tofu (firm)

3 ounces

177

Figs, dried

5 medium

135

Tortilla, corn

2

120

Tortilla, flour

2

106

Great northern beans

V2 cup

105

Turnip greens, cooked

V2 cup

99

English muffin, plain

1

99

Low-fat cottage cheese

V2 cup

69

Orange

1 medium

58

Mustard greens, boiled

V2 cup

52

Broccoli, raw

1 cup

Health

Concerns

Nondisplaced Fracture

Fractures

A fracture—a break in bone or cartilage—usually results from injury or an underlying bone disease, such as osteoporosis (see page 301). Fractures are categorized as either simple (closed), in which the broken bone does not r—5 break the skin, or compound (open), in which the broken bone punctures the skin. When the two ends of a fractured bone have not separated, it is called a nondisplaced fracture. When the two ends have separated, it is a displaced fracture. Within the categories of simple and compound are other types of fractures (see box), including transverse fracture, spiral fracture, comminuted fracture, and greenstick fracture. The type of fracture determines the choice of treatment.

In general, fractured bones are painful and limit use of the injured limb or body part. Often the injured area appears misshapen. Bruising may occur, and the limb below the fracture may tingle or become numb, cold, or pale. However, sometimes it is possible to walk on a fractured

Displaced leg or continue to use a fractured arm without realizing it is broken. Fracture

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