Overview of Treatment Approach Acceptance Theory and Intervention

Psychological Inflexibility Hexaflex Act

The following section provides detailed information about how to use ACT in a clinical setting. There are several main goals that are generally presented in order when using ACT. This is not to say, however, that the ACT goals cannot be presented in a different order, or that the ACT therapist cannot choose to emphasize one goal over another, depending on the client's specific issues. ACT is diverse and flexible and allows for a range of concepts to be presented depending on client needs. Here...

Cognitive Models Of Ptsd

Information-processing theory has been widely used to understand the development and maintenance of anxiety disorders, including PTSD (Lang, 1979, 1985). This theory suggests that emotions, such as fear, are encoded in memory in the form of networks, where representations of anxiety-provoking events are stored. Fear networks are hypothesized to contain three important types of information (1) information about the feared stimuli or situation (2) information about the person's response to the...

The Fear Structure of PTSD

Foa, Steketee, and Rothbaum (1989) proposed that a traumatic event is represented in memory as a fear structure that is characterized by a large number of harmless stimulus elements erroneously associated with the meaning of danger. These erroneous associations are reflected in the perception of the world as entirely dangerous. In a further development of emotional theory for PTSD, Foa and Jaycox (1999) suggested that the physiological and behavioral responses that occurred during and after the...