Eating Disorders

Over the past decades, numerous studies among patients in treatment have indicated the co-occurrence of eating disorders and substance use disorders. However, these studies are often methodologically limited, and have provided a wide range of estimates of eating disorders in patients with substance use disorders, from 2 to 41%. More recently, improved methodological approaches have determined that (1) substance use disorders do not have a significantly greater co-occurrence with eating disorders compared to other psychiatric controls, and (2) although eating disorders are frequently diagnosed among inpatients with substance use disorders, they are also frequently diagnosed in other psychiatric inpatients. At this time, there is no strong relationship between eating disorders and substance use disorders, and studies that report strong associations typically involve patients who have additional psychiatric disorders that frequently co-occur with eating disorders and substance use disorders (Dansky, Brewerton, & Kilpatrick, 2000).

Breaking Bulimia

Breaking Bulimia

We have all been there: turning to the refrigerator if feeling lonely or bored or indulging in seconds or thirds if strained. But if you suffer from bulimia, the from time to time urge to overeat is more like an obsession.

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