Pharmacotherapy Targeting Substance Dependence in Dually Diagnosed Populations

Although pharmacotherapies aimed specifically at decreasing alcohol or drug use (e.g., naltrexone, disulfiram) can be efficacious in improving SUD outcomes in non-dually-diagnosed populations, the literature on the use of these medications in dually diagnosed populations is quite thin. Concerns that disulfiram may cause or exacerbate psychosis (Mueser, Noordsy, Fox, & Wolfe, 2003) have contributed to a reluctance to prescribe it in patients with SPMI (Kingsbury & Salzman, 1990). While there have been no controlled studies of disulfiram in populations with alcohol dependence and SPMI, there have been a few published case reports (Brenner, Karper, & Krystal, 1994) and case series (Kofoed, Kania, Walsh, & Atkinson, 1986; Mueser et al., 2003) describing its tolerability and potential benefit for improving alcohol outcomes and hospital-ization rates for those who remain in treatment. Additionally, there is preliminary evidence that naltrexone may improve drinking outcomes in patients with alcohol dependence and schizophrenia (Batki et al., 2002) or major depression (Salloum et al., 1998). The benefit or tolerability of naltrexone in patients with bipolar disorder and alcohol disorders is less clear, based on one case report (Sonne & Brady, 2000).

Alcohol No More

Alcohol No More

Do you love a drink from time to time? A lot of us do, often when socializing with acquaintances and loved ones. Drinking may be beneficial or harmful, depending upon your age and health status, and, naturally, how much you drink.

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