Anterior Partial Veneer Crown Preparations

As stated, with the advent of metal-ceramic restorations, the use of partial veneers on anterior teeth has become rare. Nevertheless, two anterior partial veneer crown preparations are worthy of consideration (Figs. 10-22 and 10-23).

Maxillary Canine Three-quarter Crown (Figs. 10-24 and 10-25). The three-quarter crown on a maxillary canine is probably one of the most demanding of all tooth preparations. As with such preparations on other teeth, on a maxillary canine it involves the proximal and lingual surfaces and leaves the facial surface intact. However, the greater degree of difficulty stems from the different shape of the canine tooth. Unless the placement of grooves is determined very precisely in advance, there will be

Partial Veneer Crown
Fig. 10-22. A, Deficient anterior guidance resulting from years of parafunctional activity. B, An anterior partial veneer crown has reestablished it, allowing the intact sound labial tooth structure to be retained as a conservative alternative to a metal-ceramic restoration.
Partial Veneer Crown

Fig. 10-23. A, Caries-free canine and lateral incisor of adequate bulk-excellent candidates for anterior partial veneer crowns. B, The canine restored with a three-quarter crown, serving as the anterior retainer for a three-unit FPD to replace the first premolar. The lateral incisor has been restored with a modified pinledge that serves as a retainer for an anterior four-unit FPD. Satisfactory esthetics (C) with minimal display of metal are apparent.

Fig. 10-23. A, Caries-free canine and lateral incisor of adequate bulk-excellent candidates for anterior partial veneer crowns. B, The canine restored with a three-quarter crown, serving as the anterior retainer for a three-unit FPD to replace the first premolar. The lateral incisor has been restored with a modified pinledge that serves as a retainer for an anterior four-unit FPD. Satisfactory esthetics (C) with minimal display of metal are apparent.

an undesirable display of metal in the interproximal embrasures (see Fig. 10-25, A and B). The relatively short proximal walls do not allow much correction after initial groove placement. Similarly, the greater degree of curvature in each proximal wall immediately adjacent to the contact area significantly influences the location of the preparation's facial margin.

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