Anterior Teeth

The approach to waxing anterior teeth is slightly different than the approach to posterior teeth. Anatomic contour waxing is recommended for metal-ceramic restorations, because there is better control over the thickness of porcelain and the smoothness of the metal-ceramic junction. When several anterior teeth are to be restored, a guide to the lingual and labial contours is essential (Fig. 18-43). The contour of the palatal and incisal surfaces significantly influences the articulation. They are most effectively recreated by using a custom an-

Labial Tooth Palatal Tooth

Evaluation. Defects must be identified and corrected before investing. A, Marginal excess or flash (arrow) is difficult to see in wax but must be carefully removed. B, A small defect (arrow) is easier to see in the metal but harder to correct. C, Magnification is the most practical way to finish margins properly.

Evaluation. Defects must be identified and corrected before investing. A, Marginal excess or flash (arrow) is difficult to see in wax but must be carefully removed. B, A small defect (arrow) is easier to see in the metal but harder to correct. C, Magnification is the most practical way to finish margins properly.

terior guidance table (see Chapter 2). This can be made from diagnostic casts (if their initial form was satisfactory) or from a diagnostic waxing or cast made from an impression of provisional restorations. The latter can be used when the provisionals resulted in clinically satisfactory function and appearance. The shape of the anterior teeth will affect the patient's speech, lip support, and appearance. They should be determined carefully and with as many diagnostic aids as necessary.

Lingual and Incisal Surfaces (Fig. 18-44). The position of the incisal edges is determined by the overall arch form of the anterior teeth and the functional occlusal requirements. As with the waxing of posterior occlusal surfaces, cones can be used to initially delineate the approximate position of the in-cisal edge. Additional wax can then be applied as necessary.

Opposing incisors should contact evenly during protrusive movements but not during lateral excursions. This is achieved by making a concavity in the lingual surface of maxillary incisors. The ability to make this concavity smooth is very important. As a result, the patient is given a smooth envelope of motion, and potential neuromuscular disturbances are

Custom Anterior Guidance
Fig. 18-43. Optimum contours for anterior restorations are developed with the aid of a custom anterior guidance table (see Fig. 19-5).

avoided. In centric closure, anterior teeth ideally should be just out of contact. Mylar shim stock should just "drag" between the patterns. The lingual surfaces of mandibular incisors and canines are noncontacting surfaces. Nevertheless, they

Tooth Embrasure
Fig. 18-44. When waxing the lingual surface of an anterior tooth, use the contralateral tooth as a guide.

should not be overcontoured, but shaped for easy plaque control.

Labial Surfaces (Fig. 18-45). The shape of the labial surfaces, particularly the location of the mesiolabial and distolabial line angles, will determine the appearance of anterior teeth. If the labial surface is too bulbous, plaque control may be difficult, and there may be lingual tilting of the tooth caused by the force exerted by the upper lip. When waxing individual anterior teeth, careful study of the embrasure form of adjacent teeth can be particularly helpful.

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  • ALEXANDER
    How to waxing contourt of anterior?
    8 years ago
  • stephan
    Is tooth c posterior or anterior?
    8 years ago
  • john
    What make anterior teeth anterior teeth?
    7 years ago

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