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Peritubular Dentin

Fig. 14-2. Disturbance of the dentinal smear layer after contact with hemostatic agents. A, Dentin surface prepared with a high-speed, fine-grit diamond. B, After exposure to 15.5% Fe2(SO4)3 solution for 30 seconds. The smear layer is largely removed, but many dentinal tubules are still occluded. C, After 2 minutes of exposure. Now the smear layer is totally removed, although the peritubular dentin appears to be largely intact. D, After 5 minutes of exposure. Now the dentin is etched, and the peritubular dentin has been removed.

(FrontLandMFet al: J Prosthet Dent 72:4, 1994.)

Fig. 14-2. Disturbance of the dentinal smear layer after contact with hemostatic agents. A, Dentin surface prepared with a high-speed, fine-grit diamond. B, After exposure to 15.5% Fe2(SO4)3 solution for 30 seconds. The smear layer is largely removed, but many dentinal tubules are still occluded. C, After 2 minutes of exposure. Now the smear layer is totally removed, although the peritubular dentin appears to be largely intact. D, After 5 minutes of exposure. Now the dentin is etched, and the peritubular dentin has been removed.

(FrontLandMFet al: J Prosthet Dent 72:4, 1994.)

Fig. 14-3. A, Cutting a section of cord of adequate length to surround the tooth. B, From left to right: twisted cord, braided cord, wool-like cord in various sizes. C, Most cord-packing instruments have a slightly rounded tip with serrations to hold the cord while positioning it intrasulcularly. D, Initial proximal cord placement. E, An additional instrument prevents the cord from dislodging.

Fig. 14-3. A, Cutting a section of cord of adequate length to surround the tooth. B, From left to right: twisted cord, braided cord, wool-like cord in various sizes. C, Most cord-packing instruments have a slightly rounded tip with serrations to hold the cord while positioning it intrasulcularly. D, Initial proximal cord placement. E, An additional instrument prevents the cord from dislodging.

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