Ovate Pontic

The ovate pontic is the most esthetically appealing pontic design. Its convex tissue surface resides in a soft tissue . depression or hollow in the residual ridge, which makes it appear that a tooth is literally emerging from the gingiva (Fig. 20-19). Careful treatment planning is necessary for successful results. Socket-preservation techniques, which have already been described, should be performed at the time of extraction to create the tissue recess from which the ovate pontic form will emerge. For a preexisting residual ridge, soft tissue surgical augmentation is typically required. When an adequate volume of ridge tissue is established, a socket depression is sculpted into the ridge with surgical diamonds or electrosurgery. In either case, meticulous attention to the contour of the pontic of the provisional restoration is essential when conditioning and shaping the residual ridge that will receive the definitive prosthesis.

The ovate pontic's advantages include its pleasing appearance and its strength. When used successfully with ridge augmentation, its emergence from the ridge appears identical to that of a natural

Ridge Lap Pontic Design

Fig. 20-17. A and B, A pontic with maximum convexity and single point contact of the tissue surface is the easiest design to keep clean. C, Evaluating the contour of three possible pontic shapes (1, 2, and 3). Contour 3 is the most convex in area B but is too flat in area A. Contour 1 is convex in area A but is too flat in area B. Contour 2 is the best. D, An all-metal FPD with a conical pontic, suitable for replacement of a mandibular molar.

Fig. 20-17. A and B, A pontic with maximum convexity and single point contact of the tissue surface is the easiest design to keep clean. C, Evaluating the contour of three possible pontic shapes (1, 2, and 3). Contour 3 is the most convex in area B but is too flat in area A. Contour 1 is convex in area A but is too flat in area B. Contour 2 is the best. D, An all-metal FPD with a conical pontic, suitable for replacement of a mandibular molar.

Conical Pontic Design
Fig. 20-18. A, Conical pontics may create food entrapment on broad residual ridges (arrow). B, The sanitary pon-tic form may be a better alternative.
Sanitary Pontic Design
Fig. 20-19. Ovate pontic. A, FPD partially seated. B, FPD seated.

tooth. In addition, its recessed form is not susceptible to food impaction. The broad convex geometry is stronger than that of the modified ridge lap pontic, because the unsupported, thin porcelain that often exists at the gingivofacial extent of the pontic is eliminated (Fig. 20-20). Because the tissue surface of the pontic is convex in all dimensions, it is accessible to dental floss; however, meticulous oral hygiene is necessary to prevent tissue inflammation resulting from the large area of tissue contact. Other disadvantages include the need for surgical tissue management and the associated cost.

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  • jasmine
    How to create an ovate pontic?
    8 years ago

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